Survivability of Military Platforms

Course Group: 
Lethality and Survivability

This four-day course provides participants with an analysis of the science behind the materials, systems and strategies that are used to provide protection against military and terrorist threats. The focus of the course will be on armoured fighting vehicles but substantial elements of the course will be relevant to other military platforms. The course will be roughly based on the survivability onion concept.

The course will begin with an overview of the common threats facing personnel and armoured vehicles; it will then provide an analysis of the various technological approaches and materials that are often used to provide protection. The theory and science behind typical armoured protection solutions and active defence systems will also be discussed.

Attendees will receive a comprehensive set of notes covering the lecture content. The course will nominally run from 9 am to 4.15 pm with 45 minutes for lunch and 10-minute break intervals between lectures.

 

Who should attend?

Anyone requiring an overview of survivability technologies and survivability approaches for military platforms. The course is moderately technical and therefore a background in a science or engineering discipline is desirable. Most of the content will be digestible to individuals with a non-science background.

 

Course outline

DAY 1

Introduction to Protection Technologies

An introduction to survivability concepts | The survivability onion | What affects armour performance? | Obliquity |Strength of materials | Whittaker’s approach | Structural vs appliqué | Homogeneous vs laminate | Passive vs reactive vs active defence systems | Spacing

Do not be seen or acquired

An introduction to camouflage techniques | Hiding the signature of the vehicle | Minimising the silhouette

Introduction to the Threats

Ammunition concepts | Small arms and bullets | Armour-Piercing Discarding-Sabot (APDS) rounds | Armour-Piercing Fin-Stabilised Discarding-Sabot (APFSDS) rounds | Shaped charge | Missile systems | A discussion on ammunition construction and performance.

Tutorial (1 hour)

A session will be provided so that the student can work through some of the issues raised in this course under the guidance of the course presenter.

 

DAY 2

Introduction to the Threats facing Armour, continued

Ammunition concepts | Small arms and bullets | Armour-Piercing Discarding-Sabot (APDS) rounds | Armour-Piercing Fin-Stabilised Discarding-Sabot (APFSDS) rounds | Shaped charge | Missile systems | A discussion on ammunition construction and performance.

Do not be hit

An introduction to warning systems | Armour vs Active Defence Systems | Mobility vs protection

Bombs and IEDs

Introduction to explosives | Detonation | Mechanics of blast | Materials and solutions | Fragmentation effects | Calculating the fragment size, velocity and penetration | Drag characteristics.

Tutorial

A session will be provided so that the student can work through some of the issues raised in this course under the guidance of the course presenter.

 

DAY 3

Do not be penetrated  - Part 1

An overview of armour: ceramics | woven fabrics | steel | aluminium| magnesium | titanium | ERA | NERA | What materials are important for survivability?

Do not be penetrated – Part 2

Terminal ballistics and a review of penetration equations used to predict whether a hull will be breached by a projectile/ missile / jet.

If penetrated, survive

In this session issues of munition safety under extreme conditions will be addressed along with a review of human vulnerability. Egress systems will also be reviewed along with fire suppression systems.

 

Day 4

Material Penetration Tutorial

An introduction to the Recht Penetration Model and other approaches followed by a guided calculation session.

Workshop on survivability

Review of penetration mechanisms and drag characteristics of the projectiles. This workshop will involve the modelling of engagement distances and students will be expected to undertake technical calculations. Students will be asked to work in groups to come up with battlespace scenarios of lightweight armour based on some assumed data. Questions to be addressed:

  1. How close can I get to my enemy based on penetration theory (studied the previous day)?
  2. What type of IED attack can I survive?

Groups will be prepared to feed back their findings to the cohort.

Test

An optional test will be available for those wishing to gain post-graduate credit.

 

Course presenter

Professor Paul J Hazell

Paul has over 20 years of experience studying the impact behaviour of materials. In 2012 he moved to Canberra, Australia from the UK to take up the post of Professor of Impact Dynamics at UNSW Canberra. Before taking this position he was Head of the Centre for Ordnance Science and Technology at Cranfield University’s Shrivenham campus (at the UK Defence Academy). He has published extensively, appeared in several documentaries and presented his research work at numerous symposia. He has published two books on protection technologies with the most recent called ‘ARMOUR: Materials, Theory, and Design’ (CRC Press, 2016).

COURSE AVAILABILITY

CANBERRA
25 February 2020 - 28 February 2020